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Ebola Crisis in West Africa

On September 22, 2015, the Advanced Research Collaborative sponsored a panel discussion on the mortality analysis, socio-political implications, and Western response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa.


On September 22, 2015, the Advanced Research Collaborative sponsored a panel discussion on the mortality analysis, socio-political implications, and Western response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa.

Panelists included:

Leith Mullings (moderator) – The Graduate Center
Leith Mullings is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and immediate past president of the American Anthropological Association. Her research began in Africa on traditional medicine and religion in postcolonial Ghana, and her work in the U.S. addresses the consequences of class exploitation, racial discrimination, and gender subordination for the health and well-being of working- and middle-class women in Harlem.

Adia Benton – Brown University
An assistant professor of Anthropology, Adia Benton received her Ph.D. in social (medical) anthropology from Harvard University. She is a medical anthropologist specializing in HIV/AIDS, essential surgical care, race, post-conflict development, humanitarianism, and gender violence.

Kim Yi Dionne – Smith College
Kim Yi Dionne is an assistant professor of Government who teaches courses on African politics and ethnic politics. The substantive focus of her work is on the opinions of ordinary Africans toward interventions aimed at improving their condition and the relative success of such interventions. Her work has been published in African Affairs, Comparative Political Studies, and World Development.

Stéphane Helleringer – Columbia University
Stéphane Helleringer is an assistant professor of Public Health who has worked extensively in Senegal, Ghana, Nigeria, and Malawi. Most recently, his work has focused on developing new approaches to evaluating the impact of large public health programs on mortality in sub-Saharan countries.

Income Inequality LIS Book Launch

Income Inequality: Economic Disparities and the Middle Class in Affluent Countries, book launch. Panel with editors Janet Gornick, Director of LIS and professor at The Graduate Center, and Markus Jäntti, Research Director of LIS and professor at Stockholm University, and moderated by Branko Milanovic, expert on global inequality at The World Bank.

Contributing authors present their chapters: Arthur Alderson of Indiana University, Bloomington; Bruce Bradbury of University of New South Wales; Louis Chauvel of the University of Luxembourg; Nancy Folbre of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Vincent Mahler of Loyola University, Chicago; Stefán Ólafsson of University of Iceland; and Reeve Vanneman of the University of Maryland.

BA@20 Roundtable

Twenty years after the publication of Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness (1993), scholarship no longer simply posits the relationship between blackness and modernity as an irreconcilable problem. Though Gilroy posited The Black Atlantic as a ‘heuristic’ work, his ideas engendered debates in history, anthropology, and literary studies as well as political thought and philosophy—areas once perceived as the exclusive domain of an organic and hermetically sealed Western tradition. The Black Atlantic @ Twenty symposium (BA@20) aims to explore how Gilroy’s insistence that blackness figures as a constitutive element of modernity has effected a lasting transformation in knowledge production.

Graduate Center Immigration Panel

The Graduate Center, CUNY hosted “Perspectives on National Immigration Reform and New York City,” on April 19, 2013. “Perspectives” was moderated by Errol Louis, host of NY1’s “Inside City Hall” and adjunct professor, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

The Graduate Center, CUNY hosted “Perspectives on National Immigration Reform and New York City,” on April 19, 2013. “Perspectives” was moderated by Errol Louis, host of NY1’s “Inside City Hall” and adjunct professor, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. The event featured leading American scholars on immigration:

Richard Alba, Distinguished Professor of Sociology, the Graduate Center

Sujatha Fernandes, Associate Professor of Sociology, Queens College and the Graduate Center, and ARC Distinguished CUNY Fellow, 2013–2014

Nancy Foner, a Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Hunter College and the Graduate Center

Philip Kasinitz, Professor of Sociology, the Graduate Center and Hunter College

John Mollenkopf, Distinguished Professor in Political Science and Sociology, the Graduate Center

GC Experts on Immigration: Discussion on Reform

GC Experts discuss national immigration reform

Sujatha Fernandes, Associate Professor of Sociology, Queens College and the Graduate Center, and ARC Distinguished CUNY Fellow, 2013–2014

Nancy Foner, Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Hunter College and the Graduate Center

John Mollenkopf, Distinguished Professor in Political Science and Sociology, the Graduate Center

Philip Kasinitz, Professor of Sociology, the Graduate Center and Hunter College

Richard Alba, Distinguished Professor of Sociology, the Graduate Center

Inequality: The Enemy Between Us? | Richard Wilkinson

On Thursday, November 29, 2012, “Inequality: The Enemy Between Us?” was hosted at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

On Thursday, November 29, 2012, “Inequality: The Enemy Between Us?” was hosted at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and cosponsored by Advanced Research Collaborative; the Center for Humanities; (In)Equality Matters; The J. Max Bond Center for the Just City; Equality Trust; Public Science Project; Center for Human Environments; and the Graduate Center’s Ph.D. Program in Environmental Psychology.

Inequality and Economic Growth | Paul Krugman & Tony Atkinson in Conversation

As we endure the slow, uneven recovery from the “Great Recession,” there is no more critical or timely question than that of the relationship between economic growth and inequality. On May 20, 2013 at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, two of the world’s most preeminent economists discussed the connection between prosperity for some and poverty for others.

As we endure the slow, uneven recovery from the “Great Recession,” there is no more critical or timely question than that of the relationship between economic growth and inequality. On May 20, 2013 at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, two of the world’s most preeminent economists discussed the connection between prosperity for some and poverty for others.

Paul Krugman is Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton University, a 2008 Nobel laureate, and an Op-Ed columnist for the New York Times @NYTimeskrugman. He is the author of numerous books, including the recently published End This Depression Now!

Sir Tony Atkinson, Professor of Economics at the University of Oxford, is one of the world’s foremost scholars of inequality and the author or editor of more than thirty books on inequality and related topics. He recently coedited Top Incomes: A Global Perspective, a volume that analyses high-end income inequality around the world.

Moderated by Chrystia Freeland, managing director and editor of consumer news at Thomson Reuters and author of Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else @cafreeland.

Presented by the Advanced Research Collaborative @ARCCUNY and LIS @lisdata.